Institutional Partners:

 

Network Partners:

Financial Partners:

Home

C@ribNET

I  About C@ribNET  I  Topology  I  Connections  I  Training  I  C@ribNET & CARICOM I  C@ribNET Portal  I  

C@ribNET is a high capacity broadband research and education network implemented by the Caribbean Knowledge and Learning Network (CKLN),on April 26, 2012, and officially launched on February 26, 2013. This network connects all CARICOM countries and is connected to the world’s research and education community, through AMPATH to North America, through Géant to Europe and RedCLARA to Latin America. The network was financed by a contribution of ten million euros by the European Union. (See C@ribNET Updates for the latest information).

A population of approximately twenty-six (26) million in twenty-one (21) Caribbean countries can benefit from cost-effective access to high quality e-learning content and other knowledge resources from the region and around the world through the development of C@ribNET.  

What is C@ribNET ?

C@ribNET is a broadband fiber optic Network, configured to connect tertiary institutions, hospitals, schools, and CARICOM and other institutions engaged in knowledge development and research, within the Caribbean, and then to connect these institutions to research and education institutions in the rest of the world. 

Aim of C@ribNET

The aim of C@ribNET is to bridge the digital divide in the region and achieve social cohesion of Caribbean people through digital inclusion. The Caribbean was, until recently, one of the few regions of the world, without a regional research and education network.

Through C@ribNET, communities of interest are being organised to implement priority applications such as a regional digital library, a shared student information system for tertiary institutions, together with other applications supporting issues such as climate change, disaster management, crime and security, tele-health, culture among others.

In the coming years, the demand for information-sharing and computationally driven data collection will intensify. R&E networks will inevitably play a central role in enabling interconnectivity and collaboration across the world.

 

 
 

The Caribbean is Now Connected To the Rest of the World’s Research & Education Community

  

April 26, 2012

St. George's, GRENADA

 

The Caribbean Knowledge and Learning Network (CKLN), a regional organisation established by the heads of government of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), has today implemented a high capacity broadband research and education network called C@ribNET.   This network connects all CARICOM countries and is connected to the world’s research and education community, through AMPATH to North America, through Géant to Europe and RedCLARA to Latin America. The network was financed by a contribution of ten million euros by the European Union.

 

Mr. Ken Sylvester, CEO of CKLN, made the announcement at the Internet 2 Meeting in Arlington Virginia on April 22. He told network partners from around the world, "For too long, international research and education maps and language have excluded the Caribbean, as we had no network or way of connecting. That is now a thing if the past and I urge you to rapidly update your maps and language to include the Caribbean with C@ribNET! " 

 

With C@ribNET now in place, Mr. Sylvester said, “the governments, the research and the teaching and learning institutions of the region can address the growth needs of our economies by expeditiously grasping new opportunities, increasing the competitiveness of the region within the emerging global economy, and, very importantly, enhancing regional integration and functional cooperation.”


Through C@ribNET, communities of interest are being organised to implement priority applications such as a regional digital library, a shared student information system for tertiary institutions, together with other applications supporting issues such as climate change, disaster management, crime and security, tele-health, culture among others. 


Mr. Sylvester thanked the European Union for their contribution in providing the funding, and expressed his gratitude to the many partners and colleagues from the other international networks that provided invaluable guidance and assistance, to enable C@ribNET to become a reality and join the global mesh.

 



 

 

 

 How will countries use C@ribNET?

In order for individual member states to benefit from the use of C@ribNET, they are required to develop what is now commonly referred to as national research and education networks, NRENs. Developing the demand at the national and regional levels, therefore, is critical if the operations of the C@ribNET are to be sustainable.

NRENs will serve as a springboard for innovation with spin-offs to industry, education, healthcare, e-government. They play a key role in the region’s effort to integrate ICT at all levels, contributing to a knowledge based and educated society.

C@ribNET and the Global Topology

Backbone: between Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago, Dominican Republic and Florida - STM1. this can be upgraded to an STM4 (622MBps)

 

International Links: C@ribNET connects the Dominican Republic to Geant (Paris) - STM 1   Jamaica to RedCLARA (Panama) DS3 (45MBps)

(See C@ribNET Topology)

 Why is C@ribNET necessary in the Caribbean?

Education, cutting edge research, science and technology are considered key ingredients of sustainable social and economic development, stability and regional integration. Caribbean political and business leaders acknowledge that the region requires a skilled and adaptable workforce to remain competitive, and must address the increasing demand and cost for tertiary education. C@ribNET is envisioned as a vehicle that allows citizens, communities, governments, public officials, entrepreneurs and students to communicate, collaborate, form partnerships and harmonise activities across the region. 

There are several indicators, which suggest the Caribbean has experienced a reduction in its competitiveness over the last decade. In a 2005 World Bank report, it was proposed that the development of an Information Society holds promises and possibilities for developing countries to leverage the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in making significant indirect impact on their economies. Academic and research networking is now comparable to roads, water and energy services due to its impact on general economic development and social cohesion.

 

Some Current Uses of Research and Education Networks

• Virtual Laboratories
• Digital Libraries
• Interactive Digital Video and Audio
• Remote Instrument Access and Manipulation
• Humanities
• Arts Performance
• Veterinary Medicine
• Surgery and Clinical Care
• Bio-sciences
• Environment

 

 

C@ribNET is a project of the Caribbean Knowledge and Learning Netwrok, CKLN, and was developed with support form the European Union